How important is the height of your toilet?

When Thomas Crapper first displayed flushable toilets in his Chelsea showroom in the 1880s, the average height of the population was significantly shorter than today, meaning a toilet seat set at a height of 420mm from the floor seemed like a perfectly reasonable design.

However, like most inventions from the 1800s, this is no longer suitable for today’s society as our average height has increased by just under 200mm and therefore 420mm has become a long way down for many of us to go and even harder to get up from.

While there have been many technological developments relating to the toilet – such as motion sensors for the flush and devices to save water – we have been left with our pans positioned at what has now become an uncomfortable height.

This can be a particular annoyance for people living with arthritis as having to bend down lower than necessary to use the toilet only exacerbates existing joint pain. Wheelchair users also find this height frustrating as most wheelchairs are set at 480mm, making transferring that little bit harder and the use of a commode over the toilet impossible.

Solutions to the problem have emerged since the 1960s, with moulded seats and raised toilet seat frames becoming commonplace in accessible bathroom designs. However, this equipment can often make an environment look more hospital than home.

Wall-hung toilets have proved to be great in combatting issues around mobility and the toilet. They can be set at the right height for the induvidual, have a long projection pan to suit a wheelchair commode and as there is no need for a pedestal beneath the pan, they are much easier to keep clean.

Unsure what the ‘right height’ for would be for you?

Accessibility guidelines state that the optimum height for accessible toilets is 480mm, and chances are this is also the correct height for you!

We have just measured the height of our office chairs at Motionspot and have discovered that 480mm is the most common accessible and comfortable height.

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